Book Review: The Sisters Brothers by Patrick DeWitt

The Sisters Brothers, Patrick DeWitt

the-sisters-brothers-b-formatCharlie and Eli are brothers on the hunt for success and riches, along the backdrop of the Californian gold rush. There is something about this book that is slightly reminiscent of ‘Of Mice and Men’ – the whole search for success being one major similarity, and the complexities of brotherhood, the vast difference of personalities, of goals and the distance that can arise from that, and then the ultimate reliance upon each other.

We are able to view the world through the eyes of Eli Sisters, the younger brother. And the view you will get is certainly a more than interesting one. Two notorious hired killers, trailing their next target, without knowing why he is their target and without really questioning why it is that he should become their victim, but nonetheless, pursuing this task as if it is the most natural thing they could do.

What I found most interesting was how easy it is to warm to Eli, to completely accept his personal thoughts and insights, his inner humanity, with the full knowledge of his outer brutality and nonchalance towards killing and violence.

Maybe I try to look for the moral of the story in everything I read, but I found that there was a sense of morality to this book. Strangely though, I fail to see how the killing and cruelty are effectively reprimanded – rather it seems that the moral is based around the emptiness and loneliness which inevitably occur in the search for worldly gain.

All in all, I’d recommend it.

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